Double to string conversion without scientific notation

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  • Monday, August 08, 2016
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How to convert a double into a floating-point string representation without scientific notation in the .NET Framework? "Small" samples (effective

How to convert a double into a floating-point string representation without scientific notation in the .NET Framework?

"Small" samples (effective numbers may be of any size, such as 1.5E200 or 1e-200) :

3248971234698200000000000000000000000000000000
0.00000000000000000000000000000000000023897356978234562

 

For a lossless, general-purpose solution you need to preserve 339 places:

doubleValue.ToString("0." + new string('#', 339))

The maximum number of non-zero decimal digits is 16. 15 are on the right side of the decimal point. The exponent can move those 15 digits a maximum of 324 places to the right. (See the range and precision.)

It works for double.Epsilondouble.MinValuedouble.MaxValue, and anything in between.

The performance will be much greater than the regex/string manipulation solutions since all formatting and string work is done in one pass by unmanaged CLR code. Also, the code is much simpler to prove correct.

For ease of use and even better performance, make it a constant:

public static class FormatStrings
{
    public const string DoubleFixedPoint = "0.###################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################";
}

 

This is a string parsing solution where the source number (double) is converted into a string and parsed into its constituent components. It is then reassembled by rules into the full-length numeric representation. It also accounts for locale as requested.

Update: The tests of the conversions only include single-digit whole numbers, which is the norm, but the algorithm also works for something like: 239483.340901e-20

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Threading;

public class MyClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.23e-2));            
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.234e-5));           // 0.00010234
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.2345E-10));         // 0.00000001002345
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.23456E-20));        // 0.00000000000000000100023456
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(5E-20));
        Console.WriteLine("");
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.23E+2));            // 123
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.234e5));            // 1023400
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.2345E10));          // 1002345000000
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(-7.576E-05));         // -0.00007576
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(1.23456e20));
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(5e+20));
        Console.WriteLine("");
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(9.1093822E-31));        // mass of an electron
        Console.WriteLine(ToLongString(5.9736e24));            // mass of the earth 

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static string ToLongString(double input)
    {
        string str = input.ToString().ToUpper();

        // if string representation was collapsed from scientific notation, just return it:
        if (!str.Contains("E")) return str;

        bool negativeNumber = false;

        if (str[0] == '-')
        {
            str = str.Remove(0, 1);
            negativeNumber = true;
        }

        string sep = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator;
        char decSeparator = sep.ToCharArray()[0];

        string[] exponentParts = str.Split('E');
        string[] decimalParts = exponentParts[0].Split(decSeparator);

        // fix missing decimal point:
        if (decimalParts.Length==1) decimalParts = new string[]{exponentParts[0],"0"};

        int exponentValue = int.Parse(exponentParts[1]);

        string newNumber = decimalParts[0] + decimalParts[1];

        string result;

        if (exponentValue > 0)
        {
            result = 
                newNumber + 
                GetZeros(exponentValue - decimalParts[1].Length);
        }
        else // negative exponent
        {
            result = 
                "0" + 
                decSeparator + 
                GetZeros(exponentValue + decimalParts[0].Length) + 
                newNumber;

            result = result.TrimEnd('0');
        }

        if (negativeNumber)
            result = "-" + result;

        return result;
    }

    private static string GetZeros(int zeroCount)
    {
        if (zeroCount < 0) 
            zeroCount = Math.Abs(zeroCount);

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        for (int i = 0; i < zeroCount; i++) sb.Append("0");    

        return sb.ToString();
    }
}

I had a similar problem and this worked for me:

doubleValue.ToString("F99").TrimEnd("0".ToCharArray())

F99 may be overkill, but you get the idea.

Source http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1546113/double-to-string-conversion-without-scientific-notation